playful

playful
playful, frolicsome, sportive, roguish, waggish, impish, mischievous mean given to play, jests, or tricks or indicative of such a disposition or mood.
Playful stresses either lighthearted gaiety or merriment
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playful children

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in a playful mood

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a confiding, playful little animal, whom one . . . trained to do tricks— Sackville-West

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or a lack of seriousness or earnestness
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his words were serious, but in his eyes there was a playful gleam

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his pen was more playful than caustic— Williams & Pollard

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Frolicsome heightens the implications of playful; it carries a stronger suggestion of friskiness or prankishness or irresponsible merriment
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as frolicsome as a bird upon a tree, or a breeze that makes merry with the leaves— Hawthorne

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frolicsome sailors returning from their cruises . . . paraded through the streets— Nevins & Commager

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Sportive carries a stronger implication of jesting or of levity than either of the preceding words; the term sometimes implies merely excess of animal spirits, but it usually connotes a desire to evoke or provoke laughter
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three generations of serious and of sportive writers wept and laughed over the venality of the senate— Macaulay

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Roguish not only heightens the implications of sportive, but it suggests an engaging naughtiness or slyness
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"I don't think I shall want anything else when we've got a little garden; and I knew Aaron would dig it for us," she went on with roguish triumph— George Eliot

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not a pretty girl or a roguish buck in the lot— Cooke

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Waggish suggests a less engaging sportiveness than roguish and one less delicate in its character; usually also the term carries a stronger suggestion of jocoseness or of jocularity
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with all his overbearing roughness there was a strong dash of waggish good humor at bottom— Irving

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Impish adds to roguish a hint of elfish, malicious mockery
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teasing . . . with impish laughter half suppressed— Hardy

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he also displays impish ingenuity in picking his examples of error from the most dignified sources— Brit. Book News

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Mischievous combines the implications of frolicsome and impish
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took a secret and mischievous pleasure in the bewilderment of her attendants— Stafford

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Although it may imply the doing of mischief (see mischief under INJURY 1) or the causing of an injury to others it commonly retains some suggestion of mingled playfulness and malice
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the three mischievous, dark-eyed witches, who lounged in the stern of that comfortable old island gondola, . . . were a parcel of wicked hoydens, bent on mischief, who laughed in your face— Melville

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the little buried eyes still watching ... in that mischievous, canny way, and . . . hatching out some further unpleasantness or scandal— Dahl

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Often it suggests little more than thoughtless indifference to the possible effects of one's sports, tricks, or practical jokes
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a garden ruined by mischievous boys

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she . . . was . . . waked by Meta, standing over her with a sponge, looking very mischievousYonge

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Analogous words: gay, sprightly, *lively: *merry, blithe, jocund, jolly, jovial: mirthful, gleeful, hilarious (see corresponding nouns at MIRTH)

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Синонимы:

См. также в других словарях:

  • Playful — Play ful, a. Sportive; gamboling; frolicsome; indulging a sportive fancy; humorous; merry; as, a playful child; a playful writer. {Play ful*ly}, adv. {Play ful*ness}, n. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • playful — index jocular Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • playful — (adj.) mid 13c., from PLAY (Cf. play) (v.) + FUL (Cf. ful). Related: Playfully; playfulness …   Etymology dictionary

  • playful — [adj] funny, fun loving antic, blithe, cheerful, coltish*, comical, elvish*, feeling one’s oats*, flirtatious, frisky, frolicsome, full of pep*, gamesome, gay, good natured, impish, jaunty, jesting, jocund, joking, joyous, lighthearted, lively,… …   New thesaurus

  • playful — ► ADJECTIVE 1) fond of games and amusement. 2) intended for amusement; light hearted. DERIVATIVES playfully adverb playfulness noun …   English terms dictionary

  • playful — [plā′fəl] adj. 1. fond of play or fun; frisky 2. said or done in fun; jocular playfully adv. playfulness n …   English World dictionary

  • playful — [[t]ple͟ɪfʊl[/t]] 1) ADJ GRADED A playful gesture or person is friendly or humorous. ...a playful kiss on the tip of his nose. ...a playful fight... Her manner is playful and girlish. Derived words: playfully ADV GRADED She pushed him away… …   English dictionary

  • playful — play|ful [ˈpleıfəl] adj 1.) very active, happy, and wanting to have fun ▪ a playful little dog ▪ Babies are playful and alert when they first wake up. 2.) intended to be fun rather than serious, or showing that you are having fun ▪ a playful kiss …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • playful — play|ful [ pleıfl ] adjective 1. ) lively and full of fun: playful kittens She was in a playful mood. 2. ) intended to be funny or friendly rather than serious: He gave her a playful pat on the back. ╾ play|ful|ly adverb: She nudged him playfully …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • playful — adjective 1 happily active and full of fun: a playful little dog 2 not intended in a serious way: a playful kiss on the cheek | She tried to sound playful. playfully adverb playfulness noun (U) …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English


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